Matt Pryor

Matt Pryor

Matt is a graduate of Southern New Hampshire University. He appreciates all esports titles but primarily focuses on Fortnite and Call of Duty. Matt continuously analyzes gameplay and plays the games himself to better understand in-game decisions by the best players in the world.

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Ninja at the Fortnite World Cup is Best for Business

Ninja Fortnite World Cup
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The Fortnite World Cup came and went with a total prize pool of $30M USD being dished out to the best players across the globe. A notable personality known as Tyler ‘Ninja’ Blevins was absent after failing to qualify for both the Duos and Solo competitions. Although nearly making the cut alongside his Duo partner Malachi ‘Reverse2k’ Greiner, Ninja was unable to participate in Fortnite’s inaugural World Cup event outside of the Pro-Am and Creative competitions.

The Next Chapter

Ninja voiced his determination to qualify for the next Fortnite World Cup on Twitter stating, “I didn’t put the full time or effort in to be on that stage the last two days. I promise I’ll be there next year.”

This is no small proclamation as Ninja is arguably one of the most recognizable players in all of esports. He has accomplished a lot in his illustrious esports career, but a World Cup appearance would be the most prestigious by far.

A qualification for Ninja equals a win for all fans of Fortnite, both competitive and casual. Ninja’s following is undoubtedly one of the most significant, and his critics and fans would tune in to see the end result regardless of whether it’s a first or last-place finish. Viewership numbers for next year’s Fortnite World Cup would likely exceed the estimated 2 million that was reached throughout this World Cup weekend should Ninja make the cut.

Can Ninja Make it Happen?

The underlying question that stands today is whether Ninja has what it takes to compete with the 13 to 16 year old phenomes that have taken over competitive Fortnite. After all, there is a definitive gap between Fortnite Friday events and Endgame in a lobby with the best players on the planet. Everyone bared witness to the 13-year-old Thiago ‘King’ Lapp of Argentina who amassed 30 points en route to a 5th place finish. King took home $900K for his efforts without a Victory Royale. Let’s also not exclude the 16-year-old Bugha who managed an outstanding 59 points over six games to take home the $3M USD prize leaving his fellow competitors in the dust.

These sort of performances can be a tall order for a player like Ninja who has been in and out of the competitive loop over the last year. However, the outlook is positive and especially in the Duos competition as both Ninja and Reverse2k held their own over the grueling weeks of qualification attempts. As we saw with Zayt and Saf, sometimes all it takes is a crafty veteran to make some highly intelligent plays. If Ninja has as much conviction as he indicates, there is no reason to believe that he won’t qualify for the next Fortnite World Cup.


Related: Fortnite World Cup Duos Recap

Related: Fortnite World Cup Solo Recap

Image Via: The Verge

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